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CfH Lectures

Video

Bruno Latour discusses the use—and many ambiguities—of the hybrid, novel, and yet unstable concept of the Anthropocene as one informed by the disciplines of geology, philosophy, theology, and social science. Latour has articulated the Anthropocene as a “wake-up call,” radically reframing both the time and space we find ourselves living in. The final refusal of the separation between Nature and Human, which “has paralyzed science and politics since the dawn of modernism,” the Anthropocene is the most probable alternative we have to usher ourselves out of the notion of modernization at a point when “the dreams that could be nurtured at the time of the Holocene cannot last.”

This lecture is part of BAK’s long-term research series titled Future Vocabularies (2014–2016) and its chapter on “Human-Inhuman-Posthuman,” developed in a collaboration between prof. Rosi Braidotti in her capacity as BAK Research Fellow and co-organized with the Centre for the Humanities. Also part of this chapter, the exhibition and discursive environment Anthropocene Observatory by Territorial Agency (John Palmesino and Ann-Sofi Rönnskog), artist Armin Linke, and curator Anselm Franke, which was on view at BAK till 26 April 2015.